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Momal Rano مومل راڻو

17 Jun
Rano Raraku

Rano Raraku (Photo credit: Patricil)

Momal Rano

Pakistan Momal Rano (Sindhiمومل راڻو) tells the adventures of Mumal, a beautiful and dangerous, courtesanlike woman, and her lover Rano.

Rano, wrongly assuming that she has cheated him one night, leaves her alone. Eventually, after a long period of waiting, the loving woman is purified and united with the beloved, whose light she knows and recognises everywhere.[1]

Mumal Rano also appears in Shah Jo Risalo and is one of a set of seven popular tragic romances from SindhPakistan. The other six tales are Umar MaruiSohni MeharSassui PunhunNoori Jam TamachiSorath Rai Diyach and Sohni Mehar commonly known as the Seven Heroines (Sindhiست سورميون ) of Shah Abdul Latif Bhittai.

Mumal was a gorgeous princess and living in a glamorous palace named Mirpur Mathelo(it was previously named as kak mehal) inGhotkiPakistan. The story begins with the description of the charms, clothes and perfume adorning Mumal or Momal and her seven sisters and an attendant as they weave a web of magic in the Kak palace to attract rich suitors for the hand of Mumal, deprive them of their wealth and also finish them off in a maze of labyrinths, fake ponds and other illusions of the palace.

Story

The reputation of this palace, and of Mumal’s dazzling beauty soon became legend. Hamir Soomro the ruler of Umer Kot in Sindh, and his three ministers, all Sodhas by caste were attracted to the magical Kak.

One of the ministers was the young Rano alias Mahendro. Hamir attempted to reach the palace but failed. The other ministers, too, failed. Rano then ventured to try his luck. He was an extremely intelligent and courageous man which led him to succeed in reaching the palace, unharmed. Mumal was so impressed that she accepted her as her consort. He spent the night at the palace and returned to Umer Kot in the morning. He covered long distance from Umer Kot to Kak to spend time with Mumal.

One day, Rano reached Kak Mahal unusually late due to some business that he had to attend to. Mumal got so frustrated that she planned to play a trick on him. She dressed her sister Sumal in a man’s attire and made her sleep by her side. When Rano arrived, he mistook Sumal as a Mumal’s paramour.

Out of disgust he left his riding cane besides Mumal’s bed and returned to Umer Kot. Mumal pleaded Rano to forgive her but Rano ignored her requests.

Out of desperation, she set a fire and jumped in it. When Rano came to know of this, he rushed to the place where he saw that Mumal was already in flames, he joined her to be consumed by the fire along with Mumal.[2]

[edit]In Shah Jo Risalo

Sur Momal Rano (Sindhiسر مومل راڻو) is one of 30 Surs (chapters) from Shah Jo Risalo. The sections of this Sur are:[2]

  • 1. Momal expects Rano, she keeps the lamps burning till dawn.
  • 2. Beauty of Momal, she prefers Rano to other lovers, her longing for him.
  • 3. A swami Fakir returns from Momal, he gives some information of his experiences, several great men go to win her but they never return-all are killed.
  • 4. Straight way to her palace-the entreats Rano to be reconciled to her as he is offended-she can’t bear the pangs of love and separation.
  • 5. She longs for meeting with him.
  • 6. She remembers him.
  • 7. Effects of Rano’s love on Momal.
  • 8. Rano’s obligations on Momal.

References

  1. ^ Annemarie Schimmel (2003). Pain and grace:a study of two mystical writers of eighteenth-century Muslim India. Sang-E-Meel Publications.
  2. a b K F Mirza (Mirza Kalich Beg) (1980), Life of Shah Abdul Latif Bhittai:A Brief Commentary on his Risalo, Hyderabad,Sindh, Pakistan: Bhit Shah cultural centre committee

Lilan Chanesar ليلا چنيسر

17 Jun

Lilan Chanesar

Pakistan Lilan Chanesar(Sindhiليلا چنيسر) is traditional story which dates back to the time of Jam Chanesar,one of the Soomra rulers in the 14th century Sindh ThattaPakistan.It has often been retold in Sindhi and Persian.[1]

Chanesar’s wife,spoiled and pleasure loving Lilan,is enticed by another woman’s necklace worth 900,000 rupees to allow former owner of necklace to spend one night with her husband.Furious that he had been ‘sold’ Chanesar divorces Lilan, who has to undergo long process of purification until she is once more acceptable in her husband’s presence.[2]

The story also appears in Shah Jo Risalo and forms part of seven popular tragic romances from Sindh. The other six tales are Umar MaruiSohni MeharSassui PunhunNoori Jam TamachiSorath Rai Diyach and Momal Rano commonly known as Seven heroines (Sindhiست سورميون ) of Shah Abdul Latif Bhittai.

 

Story

Raja Chanesar was a well known ruler of the Soomra dynasty, who ruled Deval kot,an ancient city of Sindh near ThattaPakistan. He had a beautiful queen Lilan, who was very fond of Diamonds and Jewellery.

Contemporary to him was Rao Khengar, who ruled Lakhpat in Kutchh, in India. He had an only daughter Kaunru, who was very beautiful and engaged to her cousin Utmadi. Being the only daughter of Rana Khanghar and Mirkhi, too much love had spoiled her. She was proud of her beauty and was always worried about her looks.

One day her friend Jamni who was the sister of Utmadi teased Kaunru about her attitude, saying she was behaving as if she would be the queen of Chanesar. Kaunru was hurt and told her mother that either she would have to marry Chanesar, or she would commit suicide. Her parents were alarmed, but they were aware that Chanaesar was married and loved his queen Lila very much.

After consulting her husband, Mirkhi and Kaunru disguised themselves as traders and left for Dewal. There they managed to consult Jakhiro the king’s minister and asked him to help them. He promised he would persuade Chanesar to marry Kaunru.

When Jakhiro spoke to Chanesar about Kaunru, the king lost his temper and told him that he should not talk like that in future. In Lila’s presence he could not even think about any other woman. Jakhiro offered his apologies to Mirkhi and Kaunru and told them that there was no hope, and that it was therefore useless for them to try.

Kaunru and her mother put on ordinary dresses to disguise themselves and went to Lila’s palace. There they asked Lila to employ them in her service, as they had abandoned their country because of poverty. Lila felt sorry for them and employed them as personal servants. Kaunru was asked to arrange Chanesar’s bed every day. Time passed without any hope of success.

One day as Kaunru was preparing the bed for Chanesar, tears dropped from her eyes. Lila, who had entered the room unnoticed, saw Kaunru’s tears. She asked the reason for the tears. Kaunru told her that at one time she had also been a princess and had lived a luxurious life like her. She told her that instead of using lanterns and lamps she used to light her palace with ‘Naulakha Har’ (a necklace worth 900,000 rupees).

At first, Lila was hesitant to believe her but she soon became anxious to see that necklace. When Kaunru showed her, Lila asked her for what price she was prepared to part with it. Kanuru told Lila that she would give her necklace free to her but on one condition. Lila became impatient and asked for the condition. Kaunru told her that the necklace would be hers if she would just let her spend one night with Chanesar.

When Lila spoke to Chanesar he did not approve of her idea. One day, Chanesar came home after a party and was heavily drunk. Lila considered it her best opportunity and she allowed Kaunru into her bedroom.

In the morning when Chanesar woke up, he was shocked to see Kaunru instead of Lila sharing his bed. He was very angry and was about to leave the room, when Mirkhi (Kaunru’s mother) told him that Lila had sold him to Kaunru in return for the ‘Naulakha Har’. Chanesar considered it an insult and humilitation to be exchanged for a mere necklace.

As his revenge, he deserted Lila and married Kaunru who had given so much sacrifice for him. Lila tried to apologize, cried and begged but Chanesar refused to listen to her, saying that she had preferred jewellery to him and that he did not Love her any more. Lila after giving up all hope left his house and went to her parents. There she spent her days in misery, solitude and repentance.

Jakhiro who was the minister of Chanesar was engaged to one of the girls from Lila’s family. But they refused to give her hand to him after the fate of Lila. The minister approached Lila who intervened but asked him to bring Chanesar on his wedding, to which he happily agreed.

On the occasion of Jakhiro’s wedding Chanesar came along with the bridegroom party. Lila with other girls welcomed the party with dancing and singing but her face was Veiled. Chanesar was pleased at their performance and he was especially fascinated at the dancing and the voice of the one whose face was veiled. Chanesar begged the girl to unveil her face as he could not tolerate the situation any more. As soon as Lila opened her veil Chanesar fell down on the floor and died. When Lila saw this she also died.

References

  1. ^ Pain and grace:a study of two mystical writers of eighteenth-century Muslim India. 2003.
  2. ^ Pain and grace:a study of two mystical writers of eighteenth-century Muslim India. 2003.

External links

Soomra- Estonian village

17 Jun

Soomra 

 
This article is about the Estonian village. For Indian subcontinent dynasty, see Soomra dynasty.
Soomra
—  village  —
Soomra is located in Estonia
Soomra
 

Location in Estonia

Coordinates: 58°22′37″N 24°07′58″ECoordinates58°22′37″N 24°07′58″E
Country Estonia
County Pärnu County
Municipality Audru Parish
Population (01.01.2011[1])
 • Total 47

Soomra is a village in Audru ParishPärnu County, in southwestern Estonia. It has a population of 47 (as of 1 January 2011).[1]

Soomra is bordered by the Nätsi-Võlla Nature Reserve on its northeastern side.

Reference

  1. a b “Rahvastik / külad” (in Estonian). Audru vald. Retrieved 25 May 2011.
 
 
  Coat of arms of Audru Parish
 
 

Soomro chiefs

17 Jun
  • 1. Súmrah died 1054 AD
  • 2. Bhúngar bin Súmrah died 1068 (After a reign of 15 years)
  • 3. Dódá bin Bhúngar died 1092 (24 years.)
  • 4. Sanghár died 1106 (15 years.)
  • 5. Khafíf died 1141 (36 years.)
  • 6. Umar died 1180 (40 years.)
  • 7. Dódá died 1193 (14 years.)
  • 8. Punhún died 1226 (33 years.)
  • 9. Khinrah died 1241 (16 years.)
  • 10. Muhammad Túr died 1256 (15 years.)
  • 11. Khinrah died 1259 (4 years.)
  • 12. Táí died 1283 (24 years.)
  • 13. Chanesar died 1300 (18 years.)
  • 14. Bhúngar died 1315 (15 years.)
  • 15. Khafíf died 1332 (18 years.)
  • 16. Dódá died 1356 (25 years.)
  • 17. Umar died 1390 (35 years.)
  • 18. Bhúngar died 1400 (10 years.)
  • 19. Hamír (dethroned by Sammahs.)

Samra

17 Jun
English: Ammar, India.

English: Ammar, India. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Samra

Jat ClanSamra
Distribution Punjab (Pakistan) andPunjab (India)
Descended from:
Branches:
Religion: Sikhism
Languages Punjabi
Surnames: Samra

Samra (समरा), classically called the Samarabriëans (play /səˌmærə.brˈənz/Latin:Samarabriae), or the Sumra, or Sumrah is the surname of a clan gotra of Jats found inPunjabIndia and PunjabPakistan. At one time they were settled in the UpperIndus.

History and origin

Megasthenes divides them into three clans, the Samarabriëans (/ˌsæmbrəˈsənz/), the Sambrucenes (GreekSambroukenoi), and the Bisambriteans (/bˌsæmbrɨˈtənz/GreekBisambritai)”.[1][2] They are mentioned by Farishta, who says on ancient authority, that the Samras had a kingdom in Sindh and were in fact one of the two main Zamindars (landlords) of Sindh, up to 1380 AD when many of them embraced Islam, while the others adopted Hinduism. During the advent of Sikhism the Hindu Samras became followers of Sikhism. The Samra name is believed to be one of the original 10 Jatt Surnames from Punjab.

H.A Rose, who made a comprehensive glossary of the Tribes of Punjab and North West Frontier, mentions Sumra as one of the Jat Tribes of the Western Plains [3] and quotes from other writers like E.O’Brein and describes the Sumra as originally Rajputs. “In A.D.750 they expelled the first Arab invaders from Sindh and Multan, and furnished the country with a dynasty which ruled in Multan from 1445 to 1526 A.D., when it was expelled by the Samma”. Colonel James Tod refers to them as a part of the twin clans of Umra and Sumra Rajputs who were a subdivision of Sodha tribe of Rajputs, which in turn has been mentioned as a grand division of Parmar Rajputs who in remote times held all the Rajputana desert. Frequently combining with their brethren the Umars, gave name to a large tract of country, which is even still recognized as Umra-Sumra and Umarkot, and within which Alor and Bhukkar is situated [4]

The Samra clan of the Jats established their kingdoms in 1054. According to Ain-i-Akbari, 36 kings of Sumra clan ruled for 500 years when they were superseded by another Jat clan, the Sammas. One of their famous Samra kings was Dalu Rai or Deva Rai. It has been recorded [5] that according to the Muntakhib Tawáríkh it was in 1053 AD, that in the reign of Abdurrashíd son of Sultán Mahmúd of Ghazní, who was a weak prince, that the Súmrahs secured their independence and elected Súmrah as their chief. He was succeeded by a line of chiefs that are given below:—

  • 1. Súmrah died 1054 AD
  • 2. Bhúngar bin Súmrah died 1068 (After a reign of 15 years)
  • 3. Dódá bin Bhúngar died 1092 (24 years.)
  • 4. Sanghár died 1106 (15 years.)
  • 5. Khafíf died 1141 (36 years.)
  • 6. Umar died 1180 (40 years.)
  • 7. Dódá died 1193 (14 years.)
  • 8. Punhún died 1226 (33 years.)
  • 9. Khinrah died 1241 (16 years.)
  • 10. Muhammad Túr died 1256 (15 years.)
  • 11. Khinrah died 1259 (4 years.)
  • 12. Táí died 1283 (24 years.)
  • 13. Chanesar died 1300 (18 years.)
  • 14. Bhúngar died 1315 (15 years.)
  • 15. Khafíf died 1332 (18 years.)
  • 16. Dódá died 1356 (25 years.)
  • 17. Umar died 1390 (35 years.)
  • 18. Bhúngar died 1400 (10 years.)
  • 19. Hamír (dethroned by Sammahs.)

Distribution In India

‘Samra’ is a common surname of Jat Sikhs from the Indian Punjab. There are villages almost entirely inhabited by Samra clan in the Amritsar and Ludhiana districts of Indian Punjab. Villages with significant population of Samra clan are listed as below:

  • District Amritsar – Akalgadh, Nona, Pakhoke, Fatahpur, Bharariwal, Thande, Kotla Sultan Singh, Maari
  • District Gurdaspur – Samra, Chakawali (Near Dera Baba Nanak)
  • District Jullunder – Samrai
  • District Ludhiana – Pohir, Gorsian Makhan, Akhara
  • District Moga – Lohgarh, Daulat Pura Ucha,Jalalabad,
  • District Bathinda – Rampura Phul

Prominent Samra Personalities

  • Lieut. Shamsher Singh Samra: Winner of Gallantry Award – Mahavir Chakra in 1971 Indo Pak War “[6]
  • Major General Kanwaljit Singh Samra : Serving army officer hails from Village Bharariwal, District Amritsar.
  • Amarjeet Singh Samra : Former D.G.P of Maharastra The face that calmed Mumbai after the 13 serial blasts that killed over 250 people in 1991 “[7] [8]
  • Amarjit Singh Samra : Member of Legislative Assembly of Punjab representing Nakodar constituency of Indian Punjab.
  • Swaiman Singh Samra : Doctor and President of All American Doctors without Borders.
  • Rattan Singh Samra (Late) : Member of Legislative Assembly of Indian Punjab from Dharamkot constituency, District Moga.
  • Arvinderpal Singh Pakhoke : Former acting President of Shiromani Gurdwara Prabandhak Committee (SGPC)from District Amritsar.
  • Jodh Singh Samra : S.G.P.C. member from Amritsar District.
  • Sukhjit Singh Samra : Member of Shiromani Gurdwara Prabandhak Committee (SGPC) from Lohgarh
  • Armanjit Singh Samra

Sumras (Soomras) of Pakistan

Some influential members of the Sumra clans had accepted Islam soon after the Arab conquest of Sindh. Even after conversion they retained their old Hindu names and customs. They had intermarried with local Arab landowners and thus had acquired great influence and power. Sumra, also known as the Soomro clan of Pakistan traces its lineage to the Sumrah dynasty of Sind

See also

References

  1. ^ The Natural History of Pliny, Volume 2 by Pliny the Elder; John Bostock , Henry Thomas Riley translators.http://books.google.co.in/books?id=sDwZAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_v2_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q=&f=false.
  2. ^ Megasthenis Indica By Mégasthénè.
  3. ^ “Glossary of the Tribes and Castes of the Punjab and North West Frontier Province, By By H.A. Rose, IBBETSON, Maclagan”.
  4. ^ “Annals & Antiquities of Rajasthan, By James Tod”.
  5. ^ “A History of Sind, Vol II, Translated from Persian Books by Mirza Kalichbeg Fredunbeg, Deputy Collector, Kotri (Sind)”.
  6. ^ The Last Charge.
  7. ^ Vocal DemandsOutlook Magazine. December 15, 2008. Retrieved 2010-02-02.
  8. ^ Amarjeet Samra brought peace to a troubled cityDNA. Wednesday, May 7, 2008, 3:17 IST. Retrieved 2011-01-11.

Further reading

Soomrani

11 Apr
Indus Priest/King Statue. The statue is 17.5 c...

Indus Priest/King Statue. The statue is 17.5 cm high and carved from steatite a.k.a. soapstone. It was found in Mohenjo-daro in 1927. It is on display in the National Museum, Karachi, Pakistan. Deutsch: „Priesterkönig“ gedeutete Steinfigur der Indus-Kultur aus Mohenjo-daro (Pakistan) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Soomrani (Urdu: سومرانی ) are a sub-tribe of the Magsi, a Baloch tribe of Pakistan and Iran. Many Soomrani live in Pakistan in the provinces of PunjabSindhkhyber Pakhtunkhwa and Balochistan. In Punjab, their communities can be found in Layyah, Sahiwal and Dera Ismail Khan,. Soomrani are powerful and active in the politics of the areas they live in, especially in Layyah. They still follow the old customs and traditions of their ancestors; they are known for their orthodox way of life. They used to live in tribes but as time passed, they have begun to scatter. They had a panchat system and the chief of the tribe used to decide matters, issues and fights between the Soomrani families. The last known and accepted chief was namely Ameer Muhammad Khan Soomrani. After his death in the early 18th century, things changed and Soomrani started having enmity in their own families, which in some cases has led to bloodshed.

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